All you need to know about Labor Day

Labor Day: What it Means

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Our Department of Labor has a lot of interesting information about the origins of Labor Day, its meaning and celebrations, and other information about the history of the labor movement and the protection of American workers’ rights. Check it out while you enjoy the long weekend.

INFORMATION FOR WORKERS AFFECTED BY THE FLOODING IN LOUISIANA

DO YOU HAVE WORK ISSUES ARISING FROM THE LOUISIANA FLOODS IN AUGUST 2016?

UPDATE: La. Workforce Commission has updated information about filing for unemployment benefits http://www.laworks.net

Call (504) 861-5571 to speak to someone at the WJP’s Wage Claim Clinic.

Has your employer failed to pay all or part of your wages? Workers with a wage claim should make an appointment for services at our Wage Claim Clinic.  Leave a message on the Clinic’s phone line — (504) 861-5571 or send an email to wccnola@gmail.com. Someone will follow up with you as soon as possible. Please be prepared to answer some questions about your situation. Be prepared with the full name and address of the person who owes you wages.  Clinic staff members, law students, and volunteers use this information to help determine how best to handle your claim. The first step will be to help you to draft a demand letter and send it to the employer who owes you wages.

Feel free to pass this information and this website address co-workers, friends and family to learn more about your rights in the workplace!

Employment claims can also be filed with:

The Department of Labor (DOL) Wage and Hour Division enforces certain wage claims, overtime and minimum wage violations, and prevailing wage claims.

Local: (504) 589-6171 (extension 300 for Spanish) OR http://www.dol.gov/whd/

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) investigates workplace discrimination charges, based on things like race, gender, national origin, age, and disability status.

Local: (504) 595-2843 04 (800) 669-4000 OR http://www.eeoc.gov/
The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA)  helps to assure a safe and healthful workplace. Workers are entitled to working conditions that do not pose a risk of serious harm.(225) 298-5458 OR http://www.osha.gov/

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) protects workers from adverse actions taken by their employers for working together with other employees to better their working conditions.

Local: (504) 589-6361 OR http://www.nlrb.gov/

The Louisiana Workforce Commission is where to file claims for unemployment or workers compensation at (225) 342-3111 or http://www.laworks.net

For more information on unpaid wages and a sample demand letter, please visit this page created by Southeast Louisiana Legal Services.

Good News for Homecare Workers — Supreme Court Declines to Hear Challenge to Overtime Law

On June 27, as its term ended, the Supreme Court of the United States declined to hear the case of Home Care Association of America v. Weil, closing the door on the industry’s and for-profit companies’ last-ditch attempt to prevent home care workers from keeping their newly-won right to the minimum wage and overtime pay. More about the decision is here.

The National Employment Law Project has a good review of the long road to achieving this important victory for some of our lowest-paid, and most vulnerable, workers, most of whom are women of color. Home Care Workers Long March to Justice

Fines for Workplace Safety Violations Rise for the first time in 25 Years

Penalties for workplace safety and health violations — investigated and administered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) — are among the lowest of all federal regulatory agencies. For example, the maximum fine that OSHA can administer, even where a violation causes death, is $7,000. If the death is caused by the employer’s willful conduct, the fine can rise to $70,000. By comparison, the Federal Communications Commission can fine TV or radio stations up to $325,000 for indecent content. The Environmental Protection Agency can impose a $270,000 penalty for violations of the Clean Air Act.

As of July 1, OSHA has announced it will raise its fines for the first time in decades. Maximum OSHA fines will increase by about 80 percent, to approximately $12,000 for a serious violation and $120,000 for a willful violation of the law. Even with this increase, the fines are still low in comparison to other federal agencies. But it is a step in the right direction. Read more here.

Have a question about conditions at work or need to file a complaint about health and safety violations at your workplace? In Louisiana, call (225) 298-5458 or 1-800-321-OSHA.

Hotel housekeepers make the beds but still can’t afford to lie in them

This week marks the beginning of summer—family reunions, barbeques, and beach vacations— for those who can afford it. Those who can’t include hotel housekeepers, who like many U.S. workers over the past three decades have seen the standard features of a middle-class lifestyle grow even farther out of reach while productivity has more than doubled. …

via Hotel housekeepers make the beds but still can’t afford to lie in them.

The new overtime rule will benefit working people in every state

The Department of Labor’s new overtime rule significantly increases the number of people who qualify for time-and-a-half pay for any hours they work beyond 40 in a week.

Here is how the new rule will affect workers in Louisiana:

Share of salaried workforce directly benefiting: 24.5%

Number of people directly benefiting:174,000

Share of total salaried workforce covered under new threshold:40.8%

via The new overtime rule will benefit working people in every state.

Millions more workers will be eligible for overtime under new federal rule

Today the Obama administration and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez unveil a new rule that expands eligibility for overtime pay. The new regulations increase the income threshold below which salaried workers must be paid time-and-a-half for hours worked over 40 per week.

President Obama and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez announce new overtime regulations.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/get-there/wp/2016/05/17/millions-more-workers-would-be-eligible-for-overtime-pay-under-new-federal-rule/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_overtime-825pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

 

 

John Bel Edwards is Louisiana’s new governor. He promises “no business-as-usual.” Good news for LA’s workers.

This morning, John Bel Edwards was sworn in as Louisiana’s 56th governor. While not minimizing the state’s significant fiscal challenges, Gov. Edwards understands that the state’s economy and prosperity cannot improve without improving the lives of its working families.

“In Louisiana, 1 in 4 school-aged children live in poverty. That’s unacceptable and it MUST change.

It’s unacceptable when a parent’s hard work isn’t enough to pay the bills or go to a doctor. I’ve traveled from Algiers to Zwolle and met countless single mothers working for minimum wage behind a cash register at a gas station. Often, it’s one of several jobs they have, and they still battle to make ends meet. The faces are different, but their struggles are the same.

On top of not paying our workers a living wage, women in Louisiana make an average 66 cents on the dollar compared to men. We are the worst state in the union for pay equity. That is unacceptable. Not just for my daughters, but for all women.”

Pledging that “[w]e must make it possible for all Louisiana citizens to be healthy and prosperous,” Gov. Edwards will seek to expand Medicaid to enable many of the state’s working families access to healthcare under the Affordable Care Act. He also called for an increase in wages and for wage equity in the state.

The full text of Gov. Edwards’ speech may be read here.