WORKING EXTRA DURING MARDI GRAS? PROTECT YOURSELF & YOUR WAGES

WORKING EXTRA DURING MARDI GRAS? PROTECT YOURSELF & YOUR WAGES

 

ATTENTION: SERVICE WORKERS & RESTAURANT & HOSPITALITY WORKERS

You are working hard so that WE can make the most of Mardi Gras.

Make sure you are getting paid everything you earn.

HAVE YOU HAD WORK or WAGE ISSUES?

  • HAVE YOU BEEN PAID ALL WAGES EARNED, INCLUDING ANY TIPS?
  • DID YOU GET PAID OVERTIME WHEN YOU WORKED OVER 40 HOURS/WEEK?
  • WERE YOU CHARGED SERVICE CHARGES, UNIFORM, OR BREAKAGE FEES?
  • HAVE YOU BEEN REQUIRED TO DO BOTH TIPPED AND NON-TIPPED WORK?
  • HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED SEXUAL HARASSMENT ON THE JOB, OR BEEN DISCRIMINATED AGAINST BECAUSE OF YOUR RACE OR GENDER?

PROTECT YOURSELF AND YOUR WAGES:

  • KNOW YOUR EMPLOYER & TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT
  • KEEP TRACK OF ALL HOURS WORKED
  • DOWNLOAD A FREE TIMESHEET APP @ DOL-TIMESHEET (iTunes)

QUESTIONS? NEED HELP? CONTACT THE WAGE CLAIM CLINIC HOTLINE (504) 861-5571

NEW ORLEANS HOSPITALITY WORKER COMMITTEE (504) 657-3171

RESTAURANT OPPORTUNITIES CENTER (504) 529-5654

Undocumented Workers’ Right to Compensation for Workplace Injuries

After a 10-year legal battle, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has issued a decision affirming the right of millions of undocumented workers to protection from exploitation and discrimination in the workplace. The challenge, led by the National Employment Law Project, the ACLU, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School’s Transnational Legal Clinic, was brought on behalf of two workers who were reported to immigration authorities and prosecuted, rather than receiving the treatment to which they were entitled for injuries suffered on the job.

In its decision, the IACHR determined that the United States is responsible for violating workers’ human rights by denying them the right to equality before the law and access to justice and labor protections. The IAHCR made several recommendations to address those violations including:

  • providing adequate monetary compensation to remedy the violations;
  • ensuring all federal and state laws and policies, on their face and in practice, prohibit any and all distinctions in employment and labor rights based on immigration status and work authorization, once a person commences work as an employee;
  • prohibiting employer inquiries into the immigration status of a worker asserting his or her employment and labor rights in litigation or in administrative complaints;
  • ensuring that all workers are granted the same rights and remedies for violations of their rights in the workplace;
  • establishing a procedure for undocumented workers involved in workers’ compensation proceedings to request the suspension of deportations until receipt of appropriate medical treatment and resolution of claims; and
  • improving and enhancing the detection of employers who violate labor rights and exploit workers because of immigration status and impose adequate sanctions against those employers.

For the full report from the ACLU, click here.

 

 

Holiday wish: happy days for workers

retail-wage-violations

 

 

 

 

Holiday shopping marks a make-or-break season for many retailers. Many seasonal and regular workers put in additional time to keep the festivities festive for consumers. Most employers join in the holiday spirit, by hiring extra workers, following all wage and hour rules, and helping workers enjoy a happy holiday season. Some workers, however, will receive the proverbial coal, as a result of employers’ inadvertent, or intentional, failure to pay all wages.

The U.S. Department of Labor has tips for workers and employers to make sure the holidays are happy for all.

 

Bipartisan support for stopping misclassification of workers

As we close in on election day, one thing seems clear: no matter what their political affiliation, voters want an end to corporations’ manipulations to boost profits and the pay of their top officers at the expense of working people.

In a survey conducted by the National Employment Law Project (NELP), 84% of  those surveyed — Democrats and Republicans across age groups — disapproved of corporations misclassifying employees as “independent contractors.” “[P]olling shows that 7 in 10 voters don’t trust employers to treat their employees fairly. A majority of voters believes that working hard isn’t enough anymore, because companies simply aren’t loyal to their employees. The strategy of hiring workers as contractors, even if lawfully done, is still offensive to most of us. By 78 percent to 12 percent, voters feel that workers are better off as direct employees than as independent contractors.”

WJP is working with the La. Workforce Commission to make sure workers and employers understand what it means to be an independent contractor. Most workers are employees and should be treated that way.

 

Millions more workers will be eligible for overtime under new federal rule

Today the Obama administration and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez unveil a new rule that expands eligibility for overtime pay. The new regulations increase the income threshold below which salaried workers must be paid time-and-a-half for hours worked over 40 per week.

President Obama and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez announce new overtime regulations.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/get-there/wp/2016/05/17/millions-more-workers-would-be-eligible-for-overtime-pay-under-new-federal-rule/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_overtime-825pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

 

 

Mayor Landrieu Signs Living Wage Ordinance for New Orleans City Contract Workers

On August 18, Mayor Mitch Landrieu signed into law a new living wage ordinance for New Orleans’ city contractors and financial assistance recipients.

“If you’re working full-time, you should not be living below the poverty line,” Landrieu said.

The ordinance was sponsored by Councilmember Jared Brossett. It will apply to city contractors with contracts worth at least $25,000 and to companies or organizations that receive more than $100,000 in financial assistance from the city, including subsidies and tax breaks, over a 12-month period. Covered businesses must also provide workers with seven days of paid sick leave annually.

Read more here: http://www.theneworleansadvocate.com/news/13205062-123/landrieu-signs-living-wage-ordinance

Helping New Orleans’ Workers Recover Stolen Wages

TakePart’s profile of the workers who came to help rebuild New Orleans 10 years ago and who remain, despite wage theft and discrimination. Their story is very much the heart of the Workplace Justice Project and the Wage Claim Clinic and is still an essential element of the landscape for low-wage workers in New Orleans.

Hector Carnero Mendoza in May 2015, inside a house he was helping to renovate. He says a previous employer owes him $2,000. (Photo Ben Depp)

http://www.takepart.com/feature/2015/08/17/new-orleans-wage-theft-katrina-reconstrutction

The U.S. Once Had Universal Child Care, But Rebuilding It Won’t Be Easy

As reported by NPR, “in urging greatly expanded subsidies during his Tuesday [State of the Union] address, the president referenced a national child care program that was in place during World War II, when his grandmother and other American women were needed in the nation’s factories. The program is not widely known today, but if it seems hard to believe, you can see evidence for yourself on YouTube.”

These days, affordable, quality childcare in the U.S. is hard to find, and yet crucial to the participation of so many parents in the workforce. “This grainy newsreel from Kaiser Shipyards in Richmond, Calif., shows smiling toddlers doing puzzles, painting and listening to a woman play music. All this plus lunch and snacks, for 50 cents a day, or about $7.25 adjusted for inflation… The Works Project Administration first ran the day cares. The idea was to employ teachers and to also watch kids so that their unemployed parents could look for jobs. When women replaced deployed soldiers in the domestic workforce during World War II, the government funded a major expansion.” Read more or listen to the original story from NPR here.