INFORMATION FOR WORKERS AFFECTED BY THE FLOODING IN LOUISIANA

DO YOU HAVE WORK ISSUES ARISING FROM THE LOUISIANA FLOODS IN AUGUST 2016?

UPDATE: La. Workforce Commission has updated information about filing for unemployment benefits http://www.laworks.net

Call (504) 861-5571 to speak to someone at the WJP’s Wage Claim Clinic.

Has your employer failed to pay all or part of your wages? Workers with a wage claim should make an appointment for services at our Wage Claim Clinic.  Leave a message on the Clinic’s phone line — (504) 861-5571 or send an email to wccnola@gmail.com. Someone will follow up with you as soon as possible. Please be prepared to answer some questions about your situation. Be prepared with the full name and address of the person who owes you wages.  Clinic staff members, law students, and volunteers use this information to help determine how best to handle your claim. The first step will be to help you to draft a demand letter and send it to the employer who owes you wages.

Feel free to pass this information and this website address co-workers, friends and family to learn more about your rights in the workplace!

Employment claims can also be filed with:

The Department of Labor (DOL) Wage and Hour Division enforces certain wage claims, overtime and minimum wage violations, and prevailing wage claims.

Local: (504) 589-6171 (extension 300 for Spanish) OR http://www.dol.gov/whd/

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) investigates workplace discrimination charges, based on things like race, gender, national origin, age, and disability status.

Local: (504) 595-2843 04 (800) 669-4000 OR http://www.eeoc.gov/
The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA)  helps to assure a safe and healthful workplace. Workers are entitled to working conditions that do not pose a risk of serious harm.(225) 298-5458 OR http://www.osha.gov/

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) protects workers from adverse actions taken by their employers for working together with other employees to better their working conditions.

Local: (504) 589-6361 OR http://www.nlrb.gov/

The Louisiana Workforce Commission is where to file claims for unemployment or workers compensation at (225) 342-3111 or http://www.laworks.net

For more information on unpaid wages and a sample demand letter, please visit this page created by Southeast Louisiana Legal Services.

The U.S. Once Had Universal Child Care, But Rebuilding It Won’t Be Easy

As reported by NPR, “in urging greatly expanded subsidies during his Tuesday [State of the Union] address, the president referenced a national child care program that was in place during World War II, when his grandmother and other American women were needed in the nation’s factories. The program is not widely known today, but if it seems hard to believe, you can see evidence for yourself on YouTube.”

These days, affordable, quality childcare in the U.S. is hard to find, and yet crucial to the participation of so many parents in the workforce. “This grainy newsreel from Kaiser Shipyards in Richmond, Calif., shows smiling toddlers doing puzzles, painting and listening to a woman play music. All this plus lunch and snacks, for 50 cents a day, or about $7.25 adjusted for inflation… The Works Project Administration first ran the day cares. The idea was to employ teachers and to also watch kids so that their unemployed parents could look for jobs. When women replaced deployed soldiers in the domestic workforce during World War II, the government funded a major expansion.” Read more or listen to the original story from NPR here.

Quick Guide to Inequality

You may have heard of the recent book by French economist Thomas Piketty, Capital in the 21st Century. It’s on the New York Times bestseller list, but, at 600+ pages may be being used more as a doorstop than being read.
Times‘ columnist Nicholas Kristof has taken on the task of distilling Piketty’s findings into an “Idiots’ Guide to Inequality” here.