Mayor Landrieu Signs Living Wage Ordinance for New Orleans City Contract Workers

On August 18, Mayor Mitch Landrieu signed into law a new living wage ordinance for New Orleans’ city contractors and financial assistance recipients.

“If you’re working full-time, you should not be living below the poverty line,” Landrieu said.

The ordinance was sponsored by Councilmember Jared Brossett. It will apply to city contractors with contracts worth at least $25,000 and to companies or organizations that receive more than $100,000 in financial assistance from the city, including subsidies and tax breaks, over a 12-month period. Covered businesses must also provide workers with seven days of paid sick leave annually.

Read more here: http://www.theneworleansadvocate.com/news/13205062-123/landrieu-signs-living-wage-ordinance

Jimmy John’s asks low-wage workers to sign non-compete clauses

Jimmy John’s employment agreement includes a surprisingly strict “non-competition” clause that requires workers not to work at one of the sandwich chain’s competitors for a period of two years following employment at Jimmy John’s — But the company’s definition of a “competitor” encompasses any business that’s near a Jimmy John’s location and that derives a mere 10 percent of its revenue from sandwiches. 

If you're considering working at a Jimmy John's sandwich shop, you may want to read the fine print on your job application.

If you’re considering working at a Jimmy John’s sandwich shop, you may want to read the fine print on your job application.

The noncompete agreement is now part of a proposed class-action lawsuit filed this summer against Jimmy John’s by workers accusing the company of wage theft by forcing employees to work off the clock. Read more about the case here

Obama Executive Order on Federal Contracts

“A new executive order from President Obama will make it harder for companies to win federal contracts if they violate their workers’ rights and withhold their wages, the White House announced Thursday. Under the new rules, companies that apply for federal contracts larger than half a million dollars will have to disclose any major labor law violations they or their subcontractors have committed in the previous three years. Agencies will prioritize companies with clean records over those that abuse their workers’ rights when weighing contract bids.”

The downstairs food court at Washington, D.C.’s Union Station is staffed by low-wage workers paid with federal dollars. Credit: Flickr User Guvnah

The downstairs food court at Washington, D.C.’s Union Station is staffed by low-wage workers paid with federal dollars. Credit: Flickr User Guvnah

“The Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order will not kick in until 2016 and its provisions will only be applicable to new contracts, according to the White House fact sheet. But because the new scrutiny of labor law violations will apply to company performance over three years, the new rules serve to put contractors on notice that their treatment of workers today will affect their odds of winning their next contract.”

Read more here.